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Syed Mujtaba's Ali HOME AND ABROAD Chapter Six

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Syed Mujtaba Ali

HOME AND ABROAD , DESHEY BIDHESHEY

Translated and Edited by Siddique Mahmudur Rahman

Chapter - Six

To travel all the countries of the world one has to collect a passport and one can reach any destination. But this is not in the case of Afghanistan. After you reach Peshawar you have to collect a new stamp again. Even that do not remain valid after three days only. This system was introduced because of there’s no surety of developing any conflict around the Khyber Pass. Even you have a three-days stamp with you, if a new conflict grows up, there’s every chance of returning back the bus and bar your entry through the Khyber Pass. After collecting such stamp, we were returning back to our resting place, when I saw some busses were heading west, with bus-full of different foreign nationals.

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 November 2014 12:02

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Syed Mujtaba Ali's HOME AND ABROAD Chapter - Seven

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Syed Mujtaba Ali

HOME AND ABROAD, DESHEY BIDHESHEY

Translated and Edited by Siddique Mahmudur Rahman

Chapter - Seven

There’s a saying in Arabic language, ‘Yom-us safar, nisf-us safar[1]’. In the eastern Bengal similar sayings was also very popular, where it is said, ‘Uthon samudra perolei, adhek mushkil asan’[2]. I have to spend seven long days to cross the courtyard of Ahmad Ali’s house. On the morning of eighth day, Ahmad Ali himself put me on a seat beside the driver of a bus and made him swear to look after the wellbeing of my life and baggage and left. At the Howrah station, I felt I was ‘lonely’, now I felt I am ‘terribly lonely’. I coined the word ‘terribly lonely’, because, whether it is in ‘no man’s land’ or in ‘Afghanistan’ itself, everybody is busy is protecting himself. I heard, there are police, even outside Kabul, but in Afghan law, murder has not become a cognizable offence.  

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 November 2014 12:04

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Syed Mujtaba Ali's HOME AND ABROAD Chapter - Eight

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Syed Mujtaba Ali

HOME AND ABROAD, DESHEY BIDHESHEY

Translated and Edited by Siddique Mahmudur Rahman

Chapter - Eight

I completed my journey of Khyber Pass mixed with pain and pleasure and hoped now the temperature will subside. It receded alright, but inside the Pass the road was metallic, whether it was a narrow one. Now there’s nothing called road. After thousands of years of journey of caravans a rough path was formed on the rugged surface, now the bus is moving through that graveled path. The caravan don’t find difficulty in moving through this path, but how troublesome it is to the passengers of the bus, than only can be compared to the journey through the path of danga and khoai area of Birbhum and Bankura at night on a bullock-cart- if only the cart runs twenty miles speed and do not have thick blanket under your back, and the entire path is covered with gravel.

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 November 2014 12:05

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Syed Mujtaba Ali's HOME AND ABROAD Chapter - Nine

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Syed Mujtaba Ali

HOME AND ABROAD, DESHEY BIDHESHEY

Translated and Edited by Siddique Mahmudur Rahman

Chapter - Nine

If the Officer of Afghanistan is a poet, it is not unlikely that he foresaw our fate like a spiritualist.

Tire busted three times and engine stopped working twice getting angry upon the Sardarjee. The tire was mended by the assistant- supervised by the Sardarjee. With applying ample mehendi-paste of solution the honourable feet of the ‘lady’[1] were mended. But to make her speak, Sardarjee has to open her veil, the bonnet, and request her a lot. At one time he threatened to use handle. I didn’t know in what condition the ‘lady’ resumed her journey. But hearing multifesious sounds I presumed that the ‘lady’ is going to her father-in-law’s house with great reluctance.

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 November 2014 12:06

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Syed Mujtaba Ali HOME AND ABROAD Chapter - Ten

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Syed Mujtaba Ali

HOME AND ABROAD, DESHEY BIDHESHEY

Translated and Edited by Siddique Mahmudur Rahman

Chapter - Ten

I woke up with the azan[1] of dawn. The namaj[2] was conducted by a pustin[3] buninessman of Bukhara. I was surprised to hear his exquisite Arabic pronunciation. I thought, how could such perfect pronunciation remained in Turkistan. I asked the Radio-man, who said, ‘Why don’t you ask yourself.’

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 November 2014 12:07

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